The Traditional Spay and Neuter Debate

I am finding so much useful and interesting information on early spaying and neutering, as well as alternatives to the traditional spaying and neutering, I felt that it was better if I moved it to its own page. This is a very important decision to make in regards to your dog’s health and longevity. I encourage you to do your research, and when you think you know enough, do some more. I hope that some of these links will prove helpful. As there is no way that I can include them all, I will include those that I feel have the most basic information and invite you to do more research of your own. If you find a great article or website, please let me know so that I can add it to my list and share it with others.

For those on Facebook, there is a group called Ovary Sparing Spay and Vasectomy Group. If you are on FB, I would encourage you to check them out, as they have a lot of files with more information than I can even hope to cover that is available to those who join them.

An enjoyable article by well-known dog trainer and author Patricia B. McConnell, PhD, CAAB concerning alternatives to traditional spay and neuter.

An article by Chris Zink, DVM, PhD, DACVP, DACVSMR, of Canine Sport Production looks at spaying and neutering from a sporting dog angle.

Another interview from Dr. Karen Becker that has some interesting points that need to be considered before automatically thinking that all dogs should be spayed and neutered.

Here is an article on the Veterinary Information Network site with links to various reports and studies that have scientific viewpoints.

 


 

EARLY SPAYING AND NEUTERING I do not believe in spaying and neutering at an early age. I believe that the dogs should be allowed to mature before they are spayed or neutered. Yes, it makes it more difficult when keeping intact dogs, but it can be managed if handled properly. Dogs can also be sterilized without a full spay or neuter, so that their hormones are still available for proper growth, but they are no longer able to reproduce.

http://www.angryvet.com/spaying-and-neutering/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24432963

New  Evidence Show Link Between Spaying, Neutering and Cancer

http://dogsfirst.ie/neutering-dogs

 


 

ALTERNATIVES TO SPAYING AND NEUTERING There are actually a few alternatives to the normal spaying and neutering that will keep the hormones available in the dog. Here is a list of them and links to further information. Please do your research before making any decisions.

Ovary Sparing Spay – This is where one or both of the ovaries remain, but the entire uterus is removed. The dog will still have heat cycles, but with little bleeding, and can not become pregnant.

Parsemus Foundation – This company researches contraception in humans as well as dogs and cats. You will find more information by hovering on their Dogs & cats tab and choosing the subject list that shows up.

Interviews with Dr.  Michelle Kutzler, an expert in animal reproduction

Whole Dog Journal article

Vasectomy  – These methods allow the male to maintain his hormones without being able to impregnate a female. Males may still wander and show interest in females.

Article on Vasectomy

 

Chemical Alternatives – Non-surgical alternatives for neutering and spaying

Brief article on the American Animal Hospital Association’s site on chemical alternatives.

Zeuterin – used to sterilize male dogs. The product is Zinc Gluconate, a natural ingredient in the body. While this does sterilize them, they still may retain their male attitudes. Here is their Faqs page. Very informative.

Article by Dr. Karen at Healthy Pets on Zeuterin


 

CANCER AND SPAYING AND NEUTERING

Three articles written by . She is a veterinarian oncologist at VCA Animal Specialty & Emergency Center in New York.

http://www.dogcancerblog.com/blog/spayneuter-and-the-association-with-cancer-in-dogs-part-one/

http://www.dogcancerblog.com/blog/spayneuter-and-the-association-with-cancer-in-dogs-part-two/

http://www.dogcancerblog.com/blog/spayneuter-and-the-association-with-cancer-in-dogs-part-three/

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